UX Process in Action: Consistently pushing myself toward a better design

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Describing the new Coaster Crew website, which launched in September, has been a long story.  I began this project by learning more about the site’s target audience and developing personas, including the primary persona for CoasterCrew.net: Javier, a male in his mid-20s who typically visits parks in the Southeast US once or twice a year and loves big roller coasters and drop towers.  The ideas and design process for each page of the site have been centered on showing people like Javier, who typically aren’t familiar with coaster clubs or coaster enthusiast terminology, two things:

  1. Why should I be in a coaster club?
  2. What can I do in a coaster club - specifically, in The Coaster Crew?

In later articles, I described my design process for several of the pages on the site: the new homepage, the new In the Loop page, the events list, and a page inviting users to participate in the Coaster Crew Network Forums.  Most recently, I explained the Coaster Crew Network bar, which appears in the footer of each page of CoasterCrew.net and (in the future) the fansites to allow users to navigate around the network more easily and be more aware of all of the sites the organization offers.

I skipped over the About page intentionally.  Because it is a complex page with multiple sections and many iterations in its design, I wanted to describe it last.

Read on to see how several sections within About the Coaster Crew came to life.

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AmusementUX.com is now under construction.  This will be a new brand, yet to be named, within Dalandan Concepts for serving the amusement industry.
Join the mailing list to find out when it launches!

AmusementUX.com is now under construction.  This will be a new brand, yet to be named, within Dalandan Concepts for serving the amusement industry.

Join the mailing list to find out when it launches!

UX Process in Action: Navigating a network of 10 sites and counting

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Ever since the new Coaster Crew website launched in September, I have been writing articles describing my design process and design decisions.  The series began with a post about how I learned about both the roller coaster enthusiasts and the “general public” segment of The Coaster Crew’s audience and determined how to best target the site toward the general public while still meeting enthusiasts’ needs.  Later posts outlined how several of the pages on the site came to be: the new homepage, the new In the Loop page, the events list, and a page inviting users to participate in the Coaster Crew Network Forums.  I also went over a new membership signup flow which is not currently on the live site due to technical limitations.

Today, I’ll discuss how the Coaster Crew Network ties together with a feature that you can see now on CoasterCrew.net.

The Coaster Crew currently owns and operates ten live websites.  Their official site has been live in various incarnations and web addresses since 2004.  They started operating fansites for amusement parks several years ago when the Kings Dominion Fan Site went under their ownership.  (Prior to this, several Kings Dominion fansites had come and gone over the years.  Usually, these sites had one or two owners and would be maintained well for several years before the owners no longer had time or no longer had interest in working on the sites.)

They later launched fansites for Busch Gardens Williamsburg and Six Flags America.  Most recently, they have added fansites for Cedar Point, Kings Island, Canada’s Wonderland, Dollywood, and Valleyfair.  The Coaster Crew Network site originally just served as a gateway to their forums.  Earlier this year, I launched a complete, responsive redesign of that site with a focus on tying together all of their fansites and social media channels and providing a consistent look and feel with the other sites I have been redesigning for them.

Selling users on the idea of the fansites as being part of a network is important for the Coaster Crew.  The fansites have not always had a consistent way to navigate between them, and it can be hard to remember which fansites are in the network.  The staff suggested a network bar in the sites’ header or footer.  I decided that since tall footers with site maps are common in designs today, I could merge the network bar into a tall footer.

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UX Process in Action: The new Gospel Life Church of Bowie site on mobile devices in the wild

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This is my eighth post in a series describing the design process of the new Gospel Life Church of Bowie site. Earlier posts described how the designs evolved on the church’s homepage, Big Questions (introduction to Christianity) page, affirmation of faith, leadership page, ministries page, and membership articles. The most recent post explained the unique challenges and opportunities of redesigning a church website for a church which does not have a pastor.

Today, I will close the series with a series of screenshots of the live site on mobile devices.

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UX Process in Action: Designing a new signup flow for a roller coaster club

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The new Coaster Crew website launched in September. I’ve been writing articles about our target audience and how each page on the site came to be (Homepage, In the Loop, Events, and Forums).

Today, I’ll show you something that isn’t on the live site. I designed a new membership signup form, which was available in the prototypes that we tested with users.

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A UX Challenge: Eye-catching job descriptions

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This is my seventh post in a series describing the design process of the new Gospel Life Church of Bowie site. Earlier posts described how the designs evolved on the church’s homepage, Big Questions (introduction to Christianity) page, affirmation of faith, leadership page, ministries page, and membership articles.

Today’s article will explain the unique challenges and opportunities of redesigning a church website for a church which does not have a pastor.  One of these opportunities was an exercise in designing the Senior Pastor Job Description for the church.

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UX shows 8 reasons why you should join this roller coaster forum

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I have recently been explaining the design decisions for the new Coaster Crew website, which launched in September.  During this series, I have demonstrated how I came to understand our target audience and have illustrated my design process for the homepage (this site went from a multi-page layout to a one-page layout and back!), the new In the Loop homepage, and the Coaster Crew events list.

Today, I’ll look at a page which received some very interesting feedback from users: the Forums page.

As a freelance user experience (UX) designer, I wear a lot of hats for my one-person business.  Part of this means I maintain accounts on a lot of websites: social media sites, sites for freelancers, software vendors, and many more.  Before I started using a password manager, I was forgetting a lot of passwords.  When I evaluate a website or app, one of my first gripes tends to be this: they assume I will create an account without telling me why I should.  The worst offenders make me sign in before I even see what their site is!

Yet, this is almost exactly what I was doing with an early design for the Coaster Crew forums page.  I was giving a quick description of what the forums were and leaving them hanging.  When they tested one of my old one-page layouts, some users told me that this section “doesn’t look important, so I skipped over it.”

That’s one of the big reasons why every park, every ride company, every coaster club, and every other amusement-related organization with a website needs to have their target users test their site.

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UX Process in Action: Evolution of a coaster club’s events list in 17 screenshots

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The new Coaster Crew site went live recently. I designed it, and in a series of articles I have been explaining how. First, I explained some of the design considerations for refocusing a coaster club’s site toward the general public and not only toward coaster enthusiasts. Then, I showed how the new Coaster Crew site moved from a multi-page layout to a single-page layout and back. Most recently, I walked through the new In the Loop homepage - from sketches to wireframes to prototypes to a live site on several different devices.

Today, let’s look at how the design for the Events page changed over time. It’s one of the more visually striking pages on the live CoasterCrew.net site now, but the design today is a radical departure from how it looked earlier in this project.

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UX Process in Action: Another take on one-page layouts

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This is my fifth post in a series describing the design process of the new Gospel Life Church of Bowie site, which recently went live.

The first post described how the homepage design evolved into its layout today, while the second one addressed how the Big Questions page geared a part of the church’s website toward non-Christians. The third one described how typographic tricks gave people a readable idea for an important document that few people find engaging to read: the church’s statement of faith. The fourth post discussed the church’s leadership page. Today’s post will show my design process in action on the Ministries page.

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